Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

DanoNJ

Toy Shop Conveyor

Recommended Posts

Here is a new project I am currently working on to go a long with my existing Toy shop.  This will be a stand alone prop, fully enclosed. Down and dirty -- it contains 2 seperate sections of a conveyor; one that will bring toys into the 'machine' and out they come wrapped presents.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-rcd-kfQpM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great, now I wish I saw this before coming into work (since youtube is blocked)....  Guess I will have to wait ALL DAY to see it when I get home!  Can't wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Motor = what I normally use - wiper.  Belt is wire rope.  I'll expand on construction when I have time to write it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll expand on construction when I have time to write it up.

Please do!  Not even having seen the video yet I can imagine that I will have 4+ questions for you!

 

I've had a 3 belt conveyor toy shop in my notebook for about 4 years.  One of these days I will actually start building it!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't had a chance to see the two new videos, but loved the first one.  My plans were for something pretty similar though will probably never see the light of day.  I was going to use an actual piece of canvas to look like a belt, but I think your metal rope is a better long-term bet.  Have you considered putting some on it so it looks like an actual conveyor and the metal will be hidden?

 

I was also going to have three belts, which was going to necessitate using sprockets and chains (which I liked, but was going to drive cost up).  I like your wooden gears and it adds a little magical-ness to the display for the kids to see.  Did you use the template here:https://woodgears.ca/gear_cutting/template.html  to make your gears?  Any comments on how that process went?

 

Looks awesome, can't wait to see more updates!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, Jason, that is the site I used to get a template for the gears.  Originally I was going the canvas route also, but attaching the props would have been an issue.  No I wont be hiding the wire rope.  At night and from a distance, I don't believe people will be able to tell.

Thanks, btw!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it looks great!  Kudos for getting something functional before the end of April!  Is the second belt going to have wrapped gifts going past?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it looks great!  Kudos for getting something functional before the end of April!  Is the second belt going to have wrapped gifts going past?

That's the plan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To go along with my toy shop I am in the process of making a conveyor that will take a toy, run thru a 'machine' and come out as a wrapped present. As this thread goes along, I am planning on posting pictures of the progress.

It started with an old rolling pin which I cut into quarters. The belt will actually be wire rope, so I took the rollers and cut a grove in the center with a lathe. The groove will accept the wire rope as well a connector.

The rollers are then sandwiched between two rails and ride on a piece of rod. I put some Gorilla glue inside the roller to hold the rod.

post-7542-0-86720200-1398373619_thumb.jp

post-7542-0-43700100-1398373630_thumb.jp

post-7542-0-46252400-1398373652_thumb.jp

post-7542-0-18215500-1398373659_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

picture shows the roller with wire on one side of the stand.

Originally I was planning on using a belt to turn the rollers / belt, but found that it kept slipping, so I when and made some gears.

The gears will be visible to audience which will add to the prop.

post-7542-0-76947900-1398373850_thumb.jp

post-7542-0-82983400-1398373871_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In making the gears, I glue the pattern to the wood, then drill a hole using my drill press. I then take my scroll saw and finish the teeth. A little light sanding and done.

post-7542-0-22178500-1398373926_thumb.jp

post-7542-0-11136400-1398373940_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan how long is each table and the center box, I think this is a wonderful idea and would work good in my Santa shop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks awesome, I can't wait to see the rest of the progress!  Nice reuse of the rolling pin!

 

If anyone else is interested in the gears, the guy who created the program in the link mentioned previously has a how-to that is well worth the time: https://woodgears.ca/gear/howto.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dano, This is outstanding!  What a great and creative idea.  When you get a chance, can you show how you hooked up the wiper motor to it.  Did you connect it straight to the rolling pin or did you use a belt.  Also, did you have to use two motors to drive both sides or just one?  Can't wait to see it all done!  Keep us updated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan how long is each table and the center box, I think this is a wonderful idea and would work good in my Santa shop

Hey, Charlie. If memory is correct, each section is about 26" long, with about 5-6" of separation. The center section is roughly 24".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan that sure looks good all painted and running, the kids will love it. Are you still going to use the upper meter? I was thinking about using a cam or peg off of each of the presents to drive the needle and have it read bad, OK and good and possibly put a chunk of coal on one of the boards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan that sure looks good all painted and running, the kids will love it. Are you still going to use the upper meter? I was thinking about using a cam or peg off of each of the presents to drive the needle and have it read bad, OK and good and possibly put a chunk of coal on one of the boards.

Yes, still using the motor. Good idea, but will lead to more possible problems. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...