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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

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CHRIS-mas

How Do You.....

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How do you keep moisture from tripping your GFI. Everytime my GFI trips it shuts off my hot water heater, which is not fun considering i shower in the morning.

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First of all,you should strongly consider not using the same circuit for lights {or pretty much anything} that your water heater operates on- an electric water heater uses massive amounts of electricity such that it should be on its own,dedicated circuit.Find,or have installed,a dedicated circuit to be connected to be run to outdoor outlet{s} exclusively for your christmas lights,and other outdoor electrical loads during other seasons{like electric hedge trimmers,blowers,tools,etc}  problem solved!

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Just keep all un-grounded connections off the ground and you will be fine most of the time. Basically anything that has the 2 prong plug.The other day we had just gotten 2" of rain, not a single problem with the GFI. But consider getting breakers installed for lights like merry midget said. I will be hopefully getting a few installed next spring or summer.

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Just keep all un-grounded connections off the ground and you will be fine most of the time. Basically anything that has the 2 prong plug.The other day we had just gotten 2" of rain, not a single problem with the GFI. But consider getting breakers installed for lights like merry midget said. I will be hopefully getting a few installed next spring or summer.

 

Grounded connections are not immune from GFCI trips.  I can't think of any reason why it would matter whether it was a grounded connection or not.

 

TED

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Just keep all un-grounded connections off the ground and you will be fine most of the time. Basically anything that has the 2 prong plug.The other day we had just gotten 2" of rain, not a single problem with the GFI. But consider getting breakers installed for lights like merry midget said. I will be hopefully getting a few installed next spring or summer.   Grounded connections are not immune from GFCI trips.  I can't think of any reason why it would matter whether it was a grounded connection or not.   TED
I said that because with my experience with my display the ungrounded do connections have been the problem, but like you said basically and plug has potential to trip

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I just put in three 20 amp gfi outlets, and my display was almost under water a couple of times. I have everything on the ground, open plugs with no tape, wireframes on the ground, lots of three way plugs stacked way too many deep. I guess I got lucky! Everything worked fine even in the hardest rain.

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Take out the gfi.

and why not wrap those little plug fuses in foil to bypass them too,and put a wedge on all breakers in the box so they cant trip and you are all set!

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and why not wrap those little plug fuses in foil to bypass them too,and put a wedge on all breakers in the box so they cant trip and you are all sW

Wrap the fuses with tin foil?  Gosh and we have been clipping 10 penny nails to put in there!   :unsure:

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How do you keep moisture from tripping your GFI. Everytime my GFI trips it shuts off my hot water heater, which is not fun considering i shower in the morning.

 

Is the water heater outside?  If it's inside I don't think it needs GFCI protection.

 

Take out the gfi.

 

Resolving the problem that is causing the GFCI to trip is the right thing to do.  Removing the GFCI can cause someone to get electrocuted ESPECIALLY if you don't resolve the issue that was causing it to trip!  Taking the water heater off the GFCI might be an option depending on where it's located.

 

TED

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Wow I didn't think it was that big of deal I can see gfis in kitchens and bathrooms but outside for lights didn't think it was that big of deal. how did we alldecorate 30 or 40 years ago. My dad had a big display started it in the early 70s he didn't have any I started in the mid 80s I didn't then, and still don't have any. I don't have any problems, if I do get shocked once in awhile its because of my own stupidity. Im not going to be taking a bath outside with extension cords ran through my bath water.  I would guess that its tripping because of moisture in a connection outside I know at least where I live you cant resolve that.

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we used to paint our houses with lead...but for some reason we stopped doing that?  Insulated our ducts and pipes with asbestos....yeah, stopped doing that for some reason too?  My Dads first car didn't have seat belts....yup...another change in the last 50 years in the name of safety!

 

Building codes have changed over time and GFCIs are now required in a lot of places around the home.  Garages, Kitchens, bathrooms, unfinished basements, and yes outside outlets.  Pretty much anywhere there is a chance of coming in contact with water.  I installed a GFCI inside my house on the outlet that controls our large aquarium.  about 3 years back we had an aquarium heater corrode.  I couldn't figure out what was tripping the GFCI, until I went to remove the heater and I found that the electrical cord had corroded completely off.  Yes, think of just hanging two live wires in your aquarium and then stick your hand in there every day to feed them.  GFCI may be a pain sometimes....but they are life savers.

 

 I don't know every states codes, but check em out.

 

I would consider getting an outlet added and keep the hot water heater on its own dedicated circuit.  In NC they won't allow a dedicated freezer outlet in your garage anymore.  So for my neighbor, every time his lights trip due to rain he loses his freezer too.  He is going to get his exterior outlets moved to their own circuit.

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I never said they weren't life savers and they are great I just redid a bathroom and installed gfics didn't mean to start a

pissin match gfis trip a lot around water(rain,snow) so it can cause some troubles if I use gfis I would have to lite my display

in mid august there is not a lot of water inside your house unless something falls into the bathtub or sink. there are a lot of

laws codes and regulations not all of them are practical in every situation. I guess the best thing for the op to do is put the

hot water heater on a separate gfi circuit and yes I did say gfi.

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