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  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
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wichard623

How Do You Tie Down Large Inflatables?

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I had forgotten how poor the tie downs are that come with the inflatables.... The wind this week reminded me, it shredded all the lines to my 2 11' snowmen and all but one of the lines to my 12' Santa. I used some other lines I had laying around but I was wondering what everyone uses for their tie downs in the windy area's. Im about to just stop putting mine up as they have been such a headache this year....

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I am now in possession of a 8 or 9 ft tall bear and as a first time inflatable owner I'd be interested in any suggestions as well.

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I have around 150 inflatables.  I live on a pond with a soccer field across the street, so winds are a big problem.   I have some inflatables from 15 feet to 20.    Some of them I hand stitch my own tie downs on them.  Others I inflate them, then I use tying twine and tie the twine around the neck or other parts of the inflatable.  Off of that, I tie on rope and stake them down.    I add 4 coming off from it.    On my 20 foot snow man, I have a extra one around the stomach and neck.   That is 8 tie ropes along with all the others.  Only draw back is, when it is windy and they are deflated, if you do not lay something on them, I use fold up ladders, all the ropes to get tangled when it  blows around.     There is also a couple nights a year where it is just to windy to have them up.

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To secure my 20' inflatable snowman I use four 8" long metal stakes at the base (snowman came with four sewn in loops), and four parachute cord strings tied about 2/3 rds of the way up down to four 8" long metal stakes set on angles in the ground.  Also sewn into the base of the snowman are four "pockets" of sandbags about 6" square.  The blower is also secured to ground using three 8" metal stakes on angles.  Tried the spiral stakes from yardinflatables.com this year thinking they would hold better and they kept getting yanked out of the ground.  Replaced them with the 8" straight stakes and they worked fine.

 

Any kind of wind over 5 mph and Frosty rocks around so much that I can't inflate him. 

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I just give the spiral stakes to my father-in-law for scrap metal.   Long gave up on them.   Does the parachute cord have some "stretch" to it?    My wife gave me a 16 foot drummer guy for Christmas (yes, I have her trained well :) ) and the cords that came with it has stretch to it.    When the wind blows, it has some give to it.   That is why I use the type of rope I posted.     We had 20 mph winds one night this year, and I was able to have  close to 150 of them up.  was kind of proud of that.  Granted I had to hold the one rope for 3 hours because of the way I have to stake them so people can walk around, but was able to get through the night.

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I've learned that keeping them inflated during high winds (assuming tied down good) does less damage to them than taking down and trying to keep them from acting like a parachute.

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best stakes for us are either 8" or 10" spikes or nails from Home Depot or Lowes.  usually cost about .50 each.  store real easy in a 5 gallon bucket.  use these on about 350 inflatables each year.  we also have found it better to leave them inflated in windy conditions  very important to anchor base or blower.  use the same spikes to hold them  usually put it through a strap on the blower, twist it once or twice to keep it tight.

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I screw the bases of mine to about 24 inch pcs of plywood.    They never blow around.  Here in the North East, if I staked them to the ground, it would be hard to get the stakes out in Jan.  when the ground is frozen.    I just unscrew them, and leave the wood down til spring if the weather is bad.  I cut the ropes a foot off the ground and pull those stakes up in the spring also.  Just use new rope the next year.    I like hearing what others do in the wind.    Although I do have them staked down well, as stated I add extra ropes to them, there just are some nights where the winds are to strong to have them up. I do remember the gentleman on the Crazy Light show on TLC a couple years ago that lives I believe in the mid west that has 500 of them, saying the same thing about the winds. On the show, he was worried about not being able to have them on that night.  I believe he is a member on here.  It is wide open in our yard, pond out back, large soccer field across the street.    As stated before 20 mph winds are nothing for us.   Once they are deflated, I don't have any problems with them blowing around.  Only the larger ones because of all the extra ropes I add.  

    It is good to know that there are others on here who do not look down there noses at inflatables.  :)

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