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Lights@721

LED sign

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I am looking to make or buy an LED sign next year for my "tune to" sign as well as display some other information :songs, charity, facebook page, etc...

 

I know that you can make a great scrolling sign with pixels but I don't feel like I want to make the leap to get into xlights or anything like that. I am currently using just LOR hardware/software.

 

Anyone have anything they made they can share? or something they purchased that works well?

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That is a lot of info.  If you don't want to get into pixels I would suggest a projector.  Build the video then have it loop.

Also, don't fear the pixels.  If you are just doing a pixel matrix for a scrolling sign it isn't that difficult.  Xlights will import your LOR sequence, you build your Matrix display items to scroll, and then export it all back to LOR.  Then it plays just like your LOR sequences now.  The big difference is the cost...for the cost of a power supply, controller, pixels, matrix panel....you can get a pretty nice projector and screen.

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1 hour ago, qberg said:

 The big difference is the cost...for the cost of a power supply, controller, pixels, matrix panel....you can get a pretty nice projector and screen.

This is more my "fear".... fear of the cost. Figuring out how set it all up would be a challenge but a welcome one... Thanks though! Another show near me uses a pixel matrix, I might go see how they did it and what they spent

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I used LEDS and plywood. I drilled holes in plywood and simply pushed the lights though, think Lite- Brites that kids play with.

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I know a guy that drilled holes in a piece of plexiglass insertedI mini LEDs then covered it with a diffuser and it looks like a digital display. It is really incredible. I am going to do it next year.  I am on my phone typing this but when I get to my computer I'll try to find a photo to share. 

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Coro works too....you can buy it in black so the lights show better.  No painting or sealing required.

 

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These signs belong to Jim Hewitt in Springville, Utah. Actually it is just one sign. I love how it looks so digital. He has three sets of mini lights that he changes as part of the show. He made it using four call letters so he can change stations from year to year. Just covers the unused lights with black tape. I thought he told me he mounted the lights on plastic but the last photo does look like Coro  

Jim, if you see this I hope you don't mind me sharing your sign. 

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That looks very sharp!  Looks like the face is acrylic, frosted and masked off.  Gives off a great glow with the appearance of a carved acrylic light.

I think you could achieve some neat color wash effects with RGBs in the coro as backlighting instead of minis too.  I did a small 8x21 pix matrix this year to replace my old "tune to" bulb, but I haven't been crazy about it yet.  The scrolling text is taking some getting used to.  I vowed no new projects for next year and just to concentrate on improving the programming....but, I got these RGB controllers with open ports!

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I showed this to my wife and she got all giddy cause she could use her Silhouette to cut the black vinyl mask for the front!

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Do you have any pics of your construction and finished product qberg?

I am curious about what you used to mask off the screen and still look good

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I went with a simple alternative this year and used two large canvas signs from vistaprint.com. These are inexpensive if you can catch a sale (they have them frequently). I then used two steel sign posts (from hardware store), zip ties, and a cheap spotlight with a $15 light sensing extension cord that comes on at dark and stays on for 4 or 6 or 8 hours (that saved me a LOR channel for the display instead).

2016-11-21-17-48-37.jpg?w=736&h=414

The year before (my first year) I made a sign with lights and plywood. I thought it was cool, but it was quite small from the road and blue is really hard to see. 

20151124_172446.jpg?w=736

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ive been looking at scrolling pixel signs on utube and seems like everyone is using audrinos to power them. one guy used the internet browser to send messages to his really neat. seems to be a ton of ways to do signs i want one for next year trying figure out best way to do it.. lots use nobes but lots use the strips

 

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