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Gordonswoggle

What Lights Does Tom Betgeorge Use In His Show?!?!

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Okay so, I am creating this light show for halloween and christmas and have been riding with just flat led's, no rgb or anything, but I would like to use some this year. I saw Tom Betgeorge's layout and I noticed that he doesn't use individual nodes to outline his house. Instead he uses some kind of ribboning. (possibly LOR's color ribbon or some strips) but after searching for many other videos, the rgb ribbons all have lights that are too far spaced out and doesnt look right. If anyone can please reach back to me on what kind of lights he uses (ribbons and or pixels) then that would be great. I will leave a video to his display so you can see the outline of his house and how much light comes off the strings. As for his mega tree, i believe he is using nodes but you can correct me if Im wrong.

 

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I will preface that I know nothing about his specific setup.  However, if you pause the video at the 3:17 mark you can see the outline strips pretty clearly....along with those RGB icicles  :)  Smart RGB strips/ribbons come in a couple formats that are measured in "pixles/meter".  When you have each individual led as a pixel you are looking at something like the 30LED / 30 pixels/m or 60 LED / 60 pixel/m version.   The 30/30 has LED/pixel approx. every inch, while the 60/60 has LED/pixel approx. every 1/2 inch.  While these look amazing, your pixel count skyrockets and you require a lot of controllers.  If you went with 60/60, your power requirement is double the 30/30 version as well.  He is definitely using one of the these types of WS2811 ribbons.  If you can find an area in the pic to reference a measurement, you could count the # of pixels and figure it out exactly.

You can easily get this same looking ribbon in a 30 LED / 10 pixel/m version or a 60/20 version.  With this you will have 3 LEDs per pixel.  While the LEDs are spaced the same as the 30 or 60 LED ribbons above, each pixel is now approx. 4" in the 30/10 version and gives a little more "blocky" appearance when you do a "chase".  60/20 version the pixel spacing is closer to 2", but still has 3 LEDs per pixel.  The advantage to these is you only require 1/3 the number of pixels vs the versions above. 

Which is better?  Depends on your preference, viewing distance, what animations you want to do, thickness of your checkbook, etc.  Holiday Coro caries these and has videos/photos for you to see how they look. 

  http://www.holidaycoro.com/Smart-Pixel-Ribbon-Strip-s/1961.htm

The mega tree could be ribbons or pixels mounted in strips...I couldn't tell from the video.  But the candy canes, mini trees and snowflakes look very similar to Boscoyo's stuff so the mega tree could be using their mega tree setup as well.

https://www.boscoyostudio.com/index.php

 

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Have you at all tried to contact Tom ?   I'm sure he would be happy to share info with you.   

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Judging from the density and and the fact they controlled singly I would say 60/60 strings or 30/30.. hard to say.  But basically each led in strip has it's own ws2811.  Glad someone can afford this =p  Then again those spot lights cannot be that cheap.  Very impressive display.  If I tried that my wife would shoot me.. after beating me with a baseball bat.. after skinning me alive.

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Hey, Tom, here. If you sent me the message, I'm sorry I didn't see it or probably misread it. I use WS2811s pretty much everywhere. On the house they are 1" apart. Since they are so close, it looks like lines on video but there are just regular bulbs. Tree is 3" apart. Hope this helps! 

IMG_4031.jpg

IMG_5024.jpg

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Very impressive.  Mind if I ask just how many total watts of power all those pixels take?  My biggest issue with growing to much more is lack of circuits to plug into and convincing the wife to have a whole new circuit added.

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Did you have a secondary panel installed?  That is like 125 amps.  Don't most houses only have about 200 going in from street?

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I already have a secondary panel in the shop where half the power comes from. The LEDs are 12v. I prefer 12v so I don't have to inject power as often. 

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