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mwalz

Guide Wire Size

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What size guide wire are you running on your mega tree's? I have 4 this year. All have fence post center pole.

2 20' trees with around 30 light strands and 2 15' trees with around 20 light strands. Each mega tree has a total of 6 guide wires

I found this and it seems like a good price:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00775PDPI/ref=twister_B0741BXFHD?_encoding=UTF8&coliid=I3C9EJ4VX9L4FL&colid=2Z7H3PUER089H&th=1

Overkill? Used even lighter duty wire in the past which was a multi strand bailing wire basically. Heavy duty but want to do it the right way this year.

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Have you had issues in the past?  You didn't mention how the center posts are installed...sleeved in ground or portabase?  Also, what diameter center post?  

A large diameter post that is sleeved in the ground needs a lot less support than a mega tree in a portabase.  I have a 17' above ground, 2" conduit, 3' sleeved in ground mega tree with 2000 RGBs and just use black paracord (4x guide wires).  The tree stands easily unsupported, but the wires are there to keep it stable in the wind.  The paracord stretches and also allows me to adjust them throughout the season.

Also important is how the guidewires are staked in the ground.  But IMO either the 3/32 is fine with a 180# load rating.

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Hey all, our 26' tree isn't portable, rather a permanent mount. We use (4) 1/4" ,pvc clear coated guy wires and use stainless turn buckles to tighten them. There are 4200 lights,LED and it doesn't move but 1 or 2 inches ,with ice and snow, 40mph ect. Paracord is great Q!! But the 1/4" cable we got was a garage sale find last summer,80 ft for 10 dollars,the turn buckles where garage sale finds for 5 dollars for 10 of them, even have enough to do another one lolol. Just have to get another hook head, 2" ,1 1/2" and 1" gas pipe and lights , (I know, alot) and could do another, maybe next year... We did use permanent ,concrete mounts ,and used in ground ,sprinkler valve mounts (green) ,48" deep, 5/8" j-bolt,just above the concrete in the ground. When the tree is packed away, place the covers on them for the year. Mowing the lawn this summer was never a problem. Mower goes right over the 5 covers,never a problem.   I do say, I inspect the turn buckles once a week and didn't see any loosening at all. Storage is SOO much easier then I thought.     I know it's over engineered, but don't want any catastrophic failure...we all know light sets, RGB's,Pixels ect are crazy expensive.

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I use the galvanized stranded similar to what you are looking at.  I use 1/8" instead of 1/16.  You're talking a difference of 100 lb strength vs. 340 lb.  In all likelihood the 1/16 would hold fine, but I took the insurance and went with 1/8"  Still disappears at night.  Heck.. I think you can even order it in black if you want. 

Most failures tend to be in the pole or in the anchors.  I like steel water or gas pipe and mobile home anchors.

 

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18 hours ago, vkjohnson said:

I use the galvanized stranded similar to what you are looking at.  I use 1/8" instead of 1/16.  You're talking a difference of 100 lb strength vs. 340 lb.  In all likelihood the 1/16 would hold fine, but I took the insurance and went with 1/8"  Still disappears at night.  Heck.. I think you can even order it in black if you want. 

Most failures tend to be in the pole or in the anchors.  I like steel water or gas pipe and mobile home anchors.

 

That's what i was thinking, there is also 3/32 size as qberg said. Have you seen the black anywhere? I've inly ever seen it galvanized and coated with plastic

 

On 11/3/2017 at 5:53 AM, qberg said:

Have you had issues in the past?  You didn't mention how the center posts are installed...sleeved in ground or portabase?  Also, what diameter center post?  

A large diameter post that is sleeved in the ground needs a lot less support than a mega tree in a portabase.  I have a 17' above ground, 2" conduit, 3' sleeved in ground mega tree with 2000 RGBs and just use black paracord (4x guide wires).  The tree stands easily unsupported, but the wires are there to keep it stable in the wind.  The paracord stretches and also allows me to adjust them throughout the season.

Also important is how the guidewires are staked in the ground.  But IMO either the 3/32 is fine with a 180# load rating.

They are "potabase" because I have not found the time to get a sleeve in the ground. It's fence post rail which i believe is around 1 1/4". They aren't the strongest in the mid section but hold the weight of the lights just fine. Richard Holdman(many of you know the name) used 9k lights on his fence post rail tree back in the day. Wasn't a pulley system but I'll take that for proof of concept.

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23 minutes ago, mwalz said:

They are "portabase"

I would go with the larger size then...20' is a big tree

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Went ahead and ordered the 1/8", it was only $7 more. Will probably be able to see it fairly well, but that's ok. Better to be safer since if a tree fell it may hit the road and would definitely hit the house or a car.

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