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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Jerry Wagemann

Convert to constant on

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Yes, I have several sets of these lights, from home Depot,  " Store SKU #1003193770", also these lights, " 

 

Store SKU #1000050415. Want to convert them to constant on, so if one bulbs burns out or comes loose like GE constant on the others stay lit. Right now on these string if one comes loose or burns out  than several of them go out. Kind of a ridiculous seeing how much they cost. They even have 3 wires to each socket so I thought they would be constant on like GE. 

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According to the specifications for both sets you can set them to be constantly on a single color.  

How they wire them with only 3 leads is a bit of a mystery since most RGB light strips with complex programs typically require four leads, two for the power and two to carry the control signal.   Even a single RGB  pixel will have four leads, one for each color and the last for the + ground.  The strips I have (6803 IC)  are grouped in sets of 3 LEDs with an IC controlling three SMD 5050 LED chips.  If one fails three go out so it is not surprising that with your light string a couple would be ganged together and go out as a group.   Last year I had one 3 LED segment go out and it is a PIA to fix them because they are encased in tough plastic and not easy to cut out the bad segment and join the two ends. 

It is a sad comment on the quality of Home Depot Christmas lights if they fail so soon.  Most LEDs are rated for 50,000 hours unless subjected to overvoltage.  If you ran them 24/7 for 90 days, that is only 2160 hours.  Some of the LED strings I have are from 2008 and still going strong. 

 

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Rich depends how you are looking at this.  You expressed the consumer point of view.  Now take a look at it from HomeDepot's point of view.  You purchased product 10 years ago and haven't had to purchase a replacement product.  That's bad for business, they are losing money when seasonal products like Christmas lights do not fail.  The product manufacture and HomeDepot purposely designs components to fail prematurely so you will buy a replacement.  It's just good business.

NPR a few years ago did a story on who installs the bulbs in the Christmas lights we buy.  I thought it would have been a machine, but no, it's Chinese prisoners.  As I recall they have to install 7,000 bulbs per day to make 700 strings of lights in exchange for a meal.  The Chinese laugh at the American prisoners as best they can do is about 3,000 bulbs.  

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Jerry need more information about your sting of lights.  To understand why there are 3 wires requires some understanding of electricity.  The reason for 3 wires is because you really have two strings or lights which are wired together.  When one or more lights fail in one of the two strings all of the lights go out.  The always-on lights have a special type of wire so when one bulb fails instead fo the entire string going out the electricity flows through the special wire and the lights stay lit.

These things are made a inexpensively as possible with the cheapest materials.  I think it is well over 50% of the people who buy Christmas lights throw them out in January and the wind up in the land fill.  If you have LED lights which in theory should last over 100 years/Christmases they are being designed to prematurely fail.  If they fail, customers will make another purchase.  That's more money for the store, and more business for the company selling the lights. 

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Hey Everyone. Thanks for your replies. MY MISTAKE. They actually  have 5 wires running threw them at each base. I was just wondering if there was a easy solution to make them "constant on" like GE has a line of their lights, from their website, surely you have all heard of these, I myself have at least several thousand feet of these in all types of sizes, C9, C7, C6, etc. From GE website, " Energy Smart® light sets are the premier LED light sets in the marketplace. With ConstantON® technology, your set continues operating even if an LED is burned out or loose. I just love these light string sets like this. I put around 1000 feet around a big maple in our front yard every year, toughest thing to do, I actually do this with a 20 foot pole and go around and around this huge tree, perfectly coming down at the same making way towards the bottom, everybody always ask , " How did you do that". Let me tell you, when you have o pole 20 feet in the air with a light string attached at the end and go around the tree, the slightest bump makes it feel as though someone is grabbing the end of the pole. Extremely difficult. Cant afford getting a lift for just the 1 tree. Also, I have noticed that the Energy Smart ConstantOn light do not come with several different types of effects. Just ON. But when they are up in my tree like this, if 1 goes out the others stay lit is the way to go. Because in this new technology with many effects, this is nice, but if ones goes out up towards the top it ruins it all, and you cant just reach up and take down that string or fix it. all to that point starting from bottom of tree would have to come down. Hopefully this is all making sense to you all. THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP. Sure wish these newer lights strings were ConstantOn technology or could be converted. Dougg, I know exactly what you mean about the comment "  The product manufacture and HomeDepot purposely designs components to fail prematurely so you will buy a replacement.  It's just good business. " That is also almost everything purchased today, Cars, Appliances, etc. NOT trying to be judgemental, as we ALL have faults, but these same people who come up with these type of products today, which is considered " Good business" for them, also claim to be Christian, or believe in god and Jesus Christ, yet they have no care that they are doing this purposely, Do they or we really think that god does not know this? Do we not think for a second that he would say , why did you purposely and knowingly sell a product knowing it would only last so long, " Just for GOOD BUSINESS. HMMMMMM, This is a form of deceit and stealing no matter how we would try and justify it here. Christ cannot be fooled. Another question, anybody have a older Gemmy Carousel wheel, with the actual Christmas character, not the inflatable type? Thanks Jerry. I actually still have the Ferris wheel and the teeter totter BRAND NEW in box. 

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Jerry you know you might want to post some pictures, although not sure if that would be helpful at this time.  To answer your question we need a little science to understand electricity.  THe electricty you plug your strings of lights into is alternating current at 120 volts.  LEDs require 2 to 3 volts of direct current.  You have 5 wires, so two of the wires provide DC power with one being positive and the other being negative.  The three other wires are used to control the color,, red, green and blue.  Near the AC plug there should be a box that converts the AC 120v current to DC low voltage and some computer chips to control and charge the colors of the LEDs.  But there are other ways of doing this.  So all depends on the electrical engineer who designed your LED strings.  The other issue you will run into is companies like GE source from more than one company or change design during between production runs.  So there might not be one answer. 

For your LED strings did they include extra bulbs?  Can a bulbs be removed from the string?  If removed, then does the entire striving or half the string go out?  I suspect you can’t remove or replace a bulb.

 

When I was in college I had room mate from a forgin county.  Very nice man.  He was becoming an engineer.  In his engineering class they looked at products such as Ford car transmissions, beds, consumer electronic products and other consumer products.  In every case the product that they looked at was just slightly under engineered so statistly it would fail in a short amount a time.  He said in the case of the Ford car tansmissions there was a part that was machined just two tenthousandths of an inch too small and the transmission would fail in 5 years.  He could not understand why American companies, (known in his country for quality) were making defective products.  By the end of the semester he leaned if you want to be products which last like the Romans and Greeks did, you won’t have a job.  But build a product which lasts for a few years and then breaks, you’ll a repeat customer and continue to have a job.

When it comes to making cheap and inexpensive Christmas lights, the Chinese are the experts in the world.  

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