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Best C7 led bulbs for blowmolds.


Edmirt
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  • 2 weeks later...

First comment here after joining recently, so forgive mistakes or errors.  Found this post about l.e.d. bulbs and such, which piqued my interest.

We use 100% 15w incandescent bulbs in all our blow molds, and I've tried various l.e.d. stuff without satisfaction.  Just bought 20 pcs. of C-7, 15w bulbs from seller on ebay; if you're looking for this type, search as 'Scentsy replacement bulb'.   I believe they're intended for salt lamps and those tart-warmer doodads that don't use a candle.

And as an aside, I ordered some 15w l.e.d. equivalent bulbs from LOHAS, as mentioned previously on this thread.  Never received them,  'shipment' email from merchant contains a 'tracking' number that never shows tendered to a carrier.  So now attempting to get my $40.00 refund from Paypal.  So beware.

We have an Empire Santa/sleigh, married to 9 GF reindeer; all the reindeer are lit with the C-7 15w bulbs and show well.   The clear bulbs are also just slightly brighter than white-painted ones, if that makes a difference. 

Just got around to redesigning and fabricating the sleigh and reindeer hardware, after sitting idle in the attic for eight years.  Will try to take a decent photo and share.

Looking forward to poking around more on your site and thanks in advance for sharing your interest and knowledge with the rest of us!  Have collected blow molds for years, and now that production has ceased, Dear Husband has finally been bitten by the bug and is getting more involved in the fun.

Edited by Madam H
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  • 1 month later...
On 12/17/2019 at 10:09 AM, Franchise_24 said:

So just finding this thread, but is the E12 the same as a C7 bulb?  Same base?  I have the GF reindeers and they use nightlight bulbs, so I would like to have something brighter in them...

I think the answer you are looking for is yes but it is not necessarily the case.  "C7" refers to the glass part of the bulb.  It means  cone shaped" and 7/8ths of an inch in diameter.  The size of the base on most C7 bulbs is "candelabra".  E12 is the same as a candelabra size base.  The names of the base sizes are Mogel,, Medium, Intermediate, Candelabra, Midget, and Miniature.  (Most "standard" household bulbs have a Medium base.  Most C7 bulbs have a candelabra base.  Most C9 bulbs have an intermediate base.)

TED

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  • 8 months later...
On 12/17/2019 at 10:09 AM, Franchise_24 said:

So just finding this thread, but is the E12 the same as a C7 bulb?  Same base?  I have the GF reindeers and they use nightlight bulbs, so I would like to have something brighter in them...

I was just reading through some old post, so you may have an answer for this post already. LED bulbs have a bit of a different description. An Example a 100 watt incandescent is a lot brighter than a 60 watt incandescent bulb. Now the LED's you need to read the "K" factor. the higher the " K"  the more white the light is, The lower the K the more orange it is. Okay, with that being said and since it is inside a blow mold, I have noticed that the high 5000/6000 K works the best. Hope this helps

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When you see "40 watt LED bulb" you need to be careful in the interpreting what that means.  Here it means this LED bulb is the equivalent of a 40W incandescent bulb.  I can guarantee you that is the case because I own a couple of real 25W LED corn bulbs purchased a few years ago before I was better versed in LED bulb technology.  My bulbs are big - 3" in diameter at the top, 6" long from the top to the end of the base, and has 108 5630 LEDs.  They are blindingly bright.  I bought them to light my 2-car garage but later took them out and replaced them with bar lights that wouldn't temporarily blind you if you looked straight at them and which spread the light evenly over the entire space.  Obviously it would never fit in any blow mold except if the mold had a large opening in the base.  It would be too bright for use there anyway.  

If you buy LED lights from international sellers, some of which have warehouses in the US now, you will often find the bulbs listed as warm white, cool white, and occasionally natural white.  Warm white LEDs were designed to mimic the color emitted by incandescent light bulbs and have a yellow cast.  Cool white is much closer to sunlight and doesn't have the same yellow cast to it.  Natural white LED bubs are closest to sunlight.  I use either cool white or natural white in my blow molds as they are brighter (more lumens) for the same amount of energy.  Figure about 20% fewer lumens for the warm white version of an LED bulb.

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