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Glenn Barber

EXTENSION CORDS TO LONG

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Hey Guys,

I need some recommendations - Last year and this year I have been buying the Green 40' extensions cords from walmart for $5.00 - I have many places that I don't need 40' MAYBE 10' - I was going to cut the extension cords down and put the necessary male or female plugs on the ends - First do you recommend this - and next, if you do, what is the best plug-ins to buy - Those things can be more expensive than the entire cord. But it is a pain to have 40' of cord on a foot run.

My electrician is on his way - I should be hot with 4 additional 20 amps circuits in no time.:waycool::waycool::waycool:

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Personally I just use the 40' ones, shorter runs are usally more expensive. And I can never have enough long cords, so I just make do. I figure its a lot easier to use a 40' cord in a 5' span then it is for a 5' in a 40'.

Greg

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wrap them in a nice coil, and use a couple of zip ties. This way, next year when you need a 40' cord- you aren't cursing yourself for cutting them.

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You know guys,

you're probably right - also to buy (GOOD) female and male connetors are almost as expensive as the 40' cords at Walmart - you know it? Well my electrician friendjust left, he had to be somewhere by 3:00 - he did get 2 of my 20 amp breakers in and running and he is going to come back TOMORROW (Thanksgiving day) and finish up - he said they don't eat until 5:00 so why not come back and finish - that way tomorrow night I hope I can fire everything up. All except my Nativity Scene - I'll get that Saturday.

I am fixing to get my wife to go with me to HD and take a breaker back that broke (That will be my 3rd trip to HD today):X:X:Xfor this project - you can never get exactly what you need to first time - NEVER!!!! I am going to show her the T103 timers and throw a huge hint like "HONEY IF I JUST HAD THIS TIMER, I WOULD NEVER EVER NEED ANOTHER THING FOR THE ELECTRIC END OF THE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS." You guys think that will work? :cryingdevil::cryingdevil::cryingdevil:

Hope So, I'll let you know!!!:ornament::ornament::ornament:

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I am using several of those :waycool::waycool:I just don't want anything to get to hot! But I have really never had any problems with them at all - Hey Scot, are ready to lite up tomorrow night?

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Those smaller 'indoor' cord are usually rated at 13 amps, so there is a good chance that they are actually higher rated than the long cords, especially the 16/3 100' cords, so you would have to worry about the long cord getting too hot :)

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I wish!....I'm getting closer by the day. I figure if I work all weekend I will be able to have everything ready by Sunday Night. This is my first year for computer controlled so Im trying to figure out my cord situation also. Over the weekend I have this weird feeling that I will be at the store loading my cart with cords cringing at the total price at the checkout HA. I have about 5,000 Lights left to string and then move on to running all the power and getting my controller mounted and ready to go. I'm really feeling the pressure!!!!!!!!!I cant sit still at work.. I wanna go home!

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Not sure what you mean by geting the cords 'hot'.

How many lights are used for each cord/run?

You would need a pretty good amount of lights plugged into the standard 6' extension cord that can be purchased for about $1.25 at HD or Walmart.

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Guest

Well if you are putting more than 38 strings of mini lights on the cords then don't use the SPT! or SPT2 cords. To get to 13 amps that is what you would need.

So just to let you know.

SPT1 cord is rated at 7amps = 20.59 strings of 100

SPT2 is rated at 10amps = 29.41 strings of 100

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Glenn Barber wrote:

I am going to show her the T103 timers and throw a huge hint

Can you try to explain the T103 to me please? I believe I saw them today at HD but the guy in that dept today couldnt tell me jack! Just said i have to many lights and I should go to LEDs!

Actually the smart one is there tonight maybe I will go run down there in a few minutes. But this way maybe I will have 2 people explaining it the same way. LOL

thanks

Peggy

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Peggy13 wrote:

Glenn Barber wrote:

Can you try to explain the T103 to me please? I believe I saw them today at HD but the guy in that dept today couldnt tell me jack! Just said i have to many lights and I should go to LEDs!

Actually the smart one is there tonight maybe I will go run down there in a few minutes. But this way maybe I will have 2 people explaining it the same way. LOL

thanks

Peggy

How to tell you spend too much time at Home Depot:

*You know the schedules of the good employees.

(for me, employees ask me where something is at [or I answer the question when they stumble])

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Hey Glenn,

I hope your feeling better. I use 50 footers for most of my runs. If it's not 50' the slack gets coiled neatly next to what it's lighting. I also got 18' singles and 22' and 8' three way cords from CVS.

Those four sizes seem to work for me.

As for cutting them. A pain in the neck. How much cutting and splicing can one man take. They might not be as weather tight. And how can you guarantee that the 28'6" cord you made will be in the same spot you cut it for?

Do you really think your wife will buy the line "I WOULD NEVER EVER NEED ANOTHER THING FOR THE ELECTRIC END OF THE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS."? How long have you two been together? They (the wives) tend to develop a B.S. detector after awhile. I just stopped trying to BS mine. It's much easier to "just do it" and tell her (here's the key) AFTER I'VE SPENT THE MONEY!

"Honey, I just spent $100 on ext cords, $300 on more lights, etc etc. When she has a stroke, I stop buying. last year she stroked out at $3500. So I stopped. Then she "yelled" at me for not having enough lights on the house.

Darlene knows that I get sick every year. Usually starts mid October, and lasts until December 25. She has learned to deal with the "fever". Perhaps caught some herself!

Just remember to pay the credit card off before you start buying for 2007's display!:laughing:

Good luck

Scott

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:>> Well if you are putting more than 38 strings of mini lights on the cords then don't

:>>use the SPT! or SPT2 cords. To get to 13 amps that is what you would need.

:>>So just to let you know.

Just to let you know, If you read my post, I asked exactly how many stings were they going to use on ONE circuit.

Can't answer the question correctly until we get the proper info.

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fkostyun wrote:

wrap them in a nice coil, and use a couple of zip ties. This way, next year when you need a 40' cord- you aren't cursing yourself for cutting them.

Just a safety heads up: ;)

It is recommended that you NEVER coil your cords !!!:shock:

I have never actually witnessed it, however this can cause them to get extremely hot and catch fire. The more load the worse this effect can become!

When you coil your cord up it becomes an inductor and the concentration of the magnetic field from the 60 hertz AC can induce heating.

This principle is actually used to braze metal parts placed within a coil (usually the signal is in the RF range for more efficient heating instead of 60 hertz)

If you have excess cord it is better to have a long loop, or the best idea try to keep your cords close the right length needed.

Just wanted to pass this on so everyone is doing things as safely as possible!:)

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terrypowerz wrote:

It is recommended that you NEVER coil your cords !!!:shock:

I have never actually witnessed it, however this can cause them to get extremely hot and catch fire.

Where in the world did you hear that one? Technically this would be a series coil with no core though it would theoretically act act as a low pass filter. But in reality it's not a tuned circuit and would have relatively no effect.

Throw one in the snow and see if can even melt it. There's the proof.

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Scot,

Yes, My wife know's my BS factor well, but like yours, she likes the lites alot and is for whatever is best for me when putting them up. I have a lot of fun with herwhen I wantstuff - she usually always gives in. I love her to death! 12 YEARS WE'VE BEEN MARRIED.

I know the feeling on the cord's thing - Wallmart Monday $224 and I am still going tobe short by about 15 cords.:shock::shock: I have about 3 to 4 hours worth of work left after my electrician leaves tomorrow and I will be "almost ready". I still have the Nativity scene to deal with on Saturday. :cool: I was testing some tonight and had tons of people driving by really giving me compliments. People around the neighborhood are getting fired up about putting their lites up.

On my cords, I am using the little short ones to connect my mini Trees - that works well. All you guys pretty much have me convinced just to stick with the 40 footers. It's a better deal plus Greg your right - 40 footers can always be used in a 5 foot area but a 5 foot cord will not work in a 40 foot area.:rudolph::rudolph::rudolph:

Peggy,

I don't know that much about the T103 Timer either. I know it will handle 40 amps and is suppose to be the best timer for whatwe need. The T101 came highly recommended also. My guy at HD could not tell me Jack either. Heck, he didn't even know they carried them. I had to tell him the guys (and girls) on PlanetChristmas told me HD had them - then of course I had to go into a long explaination of what PC was. :X:X:X What does thetimer have to do with Led's - where do they get some of these guys to work at HD?:shock::shock:Peggy, Santaman, put me on to the T103 - He recommends them highly, maybe he will chime in here when he reads these responses and tell you more about it. I have not bought them yet but I am close.

John,

You're right, where I am using the short indoor type of cords, I am not putting them on but 1 0r 2 strings of mini'sat a time - I'm sure they won't get hot.

Ben,

I didn't realize that the short cords where rated higher that most of the long cords. Man, you learn something on this sight every day.

Guys and Girls, It is 2:23am here in Spring Hill, TN - I am "wired UP" :waycool:get it??? - can't sleep. I have to go to bed - We have a BIG day tomorrow with family and then it is back to houseand on to finishing my lites up so I can debut tomorrow night. I guess I will turn on the TV for awhile and watch that 60's music info commercial that comes on every night after "Walker Texas Ranger". Good night - Hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving. I know we plan on it around here.

Glenn

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ErnieHorning wrote:

terrypowerz wrote:

Where in the world did you hear that one? Technically this would be a series coil with no core though it would theoretically act act as a low pass filter. But in reality it's not a tuned circuit and would have relatively no effect.

Throw one in the snow and see if can even melt it. There's the proof.

Ernie,

You may be right...I think the concentration of heat caused by voltage drop in the cord probably has more effect than induction...

HOWEVER......

Coiled cords cause hundreds of fires a year, so I stick by my recommendation.;)

My concern was not with the technical cause...but PC member's safety!

So.....NEVER coil your extension cords!:happytree:

I think the coiled cord in the pic would melt snow.....:shock:

Terry

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my dad knows how to do the construction loop with extension cords, though he has showed me many times, i always try failing miserably, but i works it makes the cords shorter without cutting them and they are not coiled up as in that picture but are more of loop so it would make the cord about half the lenght of the regular cord.

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DarrenJeffries wrote:

technically speaking most indoor light bulbs are lit by a coiled wire heating up gas.... so i would agree, never coil cords, especially under heavy loads.

There is your answer tight there.... "under heavy loads". Don't overload the cord, keep that 80% rule in effect.

Greg

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OK, I did some further investigation on this. A coiled extension cord can cause over heating in some circumstances. It has nothing to do with acting like a transformer though.

All extension cords will have some resistance and when you pass current through wires, there will be some heating. This is fine because even up to the maximum current, the wire will dissipate enough heat to keep the temperature of the wire to well within a safe level. But, if you overlay the wire with several layers (a coil or just a haphazard pile) the heat from the multiple wires will begin to add to each other. This will only be a concern if you are using your cords more near the maximum current. In this case, it could build up excessive heat in this area and melt the insulation on the cord and the wires inside.

If you’re not running a lot of current through your power cords, then there won’t be a problem. If you’re sending more than 50% of the maximum current rating through your power cord, you shouldn’t lay multiple layers of the same cord on top of each other. You could also have a similar situation if you ran several high current power cords next to each other, even if you don’t loop the cords.

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Well, I debuted tonight (Thanksgiving) and everything went pretty good. I am still not finished with everything - But I have to say it looked good. My electrician didn't show and he will be here tomorrow so I can finish up by Saturday night. But had lots of cars drive by slow and gave lots of compliments.:ornament::ornament::ornament::ornament::ornament::ornament:

Man, I love this time of year - The Tennessean Story will be out Saturday Morning.

Did anyone else debut tonight - if so, how did it go?

Glenn

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