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Using indoor cords, and triple taps bad??? I sure hope not because I have ALOT of those. lol I have 16 triple taps just on my LOR controller. I have been using triple taps, and indoor extension cords for years, and not had a problem. I think you just need to make sure that they are not where they get LOADED with water, and make sure not to OVERLOAD them with juice coming through them. My homemade wire harnesse are even thinner using spt-1. Really helped out to get 16 channels on the roof WITHOUT a huge amt of cord.

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Unfortunately they always show that. Rich Faucher got caught doing it a few years back too! Personally I was disappointed in this year's show. Maybe because the regulars saw how HGTV pushes people to do certain things with their displays inorder to get on TV. I don't do a display for HGTV and I won't do something in my display just because they want me too. Just my opinion. All displays were nice though.

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Not that I promote it, but I buy indoor 6' cords at Walmart for less than .70. I then splice the cord to the lengh I need. When spliced, the connections are heat-shrinked to seal out moisture.

Yes, time-consuming-but now I have the perfect length cord I need for the display.

Ohh, did I mention, second year of bagging my plugs on the ground with zip-lock sandwich bags which you really don't see at night.

HAve had over three days of rain and more snow that we normally get this time of year, no breaker trips!

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I have a few hundred feet of indoor cords that I use as well as at least thirty triple taps. I don't see a problem using these items. You just need to make sure you know where they all are so you don't grab them with the snow blower. Also, you shuld use a meter and know exactly how many amps you are pulling on each circut. Planet Christmas has a nice chart that can help people ball park a lighting load.

~ Jim :tree:

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I use indoor cords outside and mine are working fine under several inches of snow. I only use them for short gaps and connections though. For runs longer then 10-12 feet, I use the regular 3 prong outdoor cords. They have worked fine for the past two or three years for me. I also use triple taps. I have been doing so for much linger than I have been using indoor cords outside. I haven't had any problems with either of the two. You just have to be careful when using anything that is indoor rated. As long as you take care of them and not abuse the heck out of them, you will be fine.

Will Sanders

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I think virtually everyone here uses 'indoor' cords outside. Christmas displays generally don't need the third grounding prong, and the wire on those cords is the same wire that comes with blowmolds and C7/C9 strings, which are outdoor rated. Indoor cords have exposed outlets, but so do Christmas light strings. As was noted, you just need to make sure they're not sitting in a lot of moisture. I try to keep all my connections raised off the ground if at all possible.

-Tim

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Jeff_Womack wrote:

Unfortunately they always show that. Rich Faucher got caught doing it a few years back too! Personally I was disappointed in this year's show. Maybe because the regulars saw how HGTV pushes people to do certain things with their displays inorder to get on TV. I don't do a display for HGTV and I won't do something in my display just because they want me too. Just my opinion. All displays were nice though.

They do that? thats bull. i would never do what they want just so i can be on tv. this is easier. LOL:laughing:http://gemmydisplays.com/Nick_house_PA_airblown_inflatabl.html

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My wife and I watched it on Sunday night. It didn't empress me all to much. I know I have seen way better on here looking at some of the other peoples displays. Not that the displays are not good just have seen better. And alot of it was too wierd. I liked watching the show on the White House Displays better.

JR

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  • 3 weeks later...

This is the closest thread to my question I could find when searching this site. Every year my lights trip the GFCI circuit when it rains. I am using indoor/outdoor lights and outdoor extenion cords, but when they get wet they trip. If I could find a circuit taht was not GFCI, would I be putting myself in danger to plug over a thousand lights in that way? It would be hard to do since all of my available outlets are on the GFCI circuit. Also, are you supposed to use "indoor/outdoor" lights in an area that gets a lot of rain? BTW, what are "commercial" lights? Are those better to buy?

I also used zip lock bags for some connections and that seemed to make things worse.

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It makes more sense than the heavy orange triple taps I buy that say on the package "for indoor use only." They have never given me a problem outside. Although, I have to wonder why someone would want to use a huge blaze orange connection indoors;maybe it's the lawyers' doings; tell them it's indoor only and you can't be sued.

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Using lamb cord (indoor type wiring) and making your own connections (see Darryl's strobe DIY on his website) most moisture is kept out by simply using electrical tape, correct? What I'm taking away from this thread (and, if I'm understanding the concensious) is if the connection is in direct contact with the ground, sandwich bags work fine.If the connection is hanging, like Darryl's strobes, black tape is sufficient. Besides, you not only have the breaker, but hopefully the LOR is plugged into a GFI, right? So, the other thing that I'm understanding that you'd really only need a grounded, outdoor cord for devises that require more draw, like a fog machine, a snow machine or some major flood lamps.

In the grand scheme of things, would this be a good assumption?

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I prefer to use indoor extension cords outside i did have some problems this year, i had to replace a few since they were about as old as my grandparents. I usually put electrical tape around the plugs and it keeps the moisture out. Also does anyone file there plugs to make them fit into the back side of christmas lights, for instance the plugs on the blowmolds so that they will be narrow on both sides of the plug?? Just wondering

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EAB wrote:

So, the other thing that I'm understanding that you'd really only need a grounded, outdoor cord for devises that require more draw, like a fog machine, a snow machine or some major flood lamps.

In the grand scheme of things, would this be a good assumption?

You need three prong (grounded) cords for metal cased items or items where there is a risk of electrical current jumping outside of the appliance. The third prong is for grounding and is a safety issue. So, if you have something like a bubble machine with metal case, yes ground it. If you use AL or LOR controllers in metal enclosures they should be grounded. A standard string of Christmas lights has nothing to ground so plugging them into a three prong cord does absolutely no good. Electrical current is always seeking a way to get to earth/ground. This just gives it a path when things go wrong.

Also, don't thing that by grounding something you are completely safe from shock hazards. It helps but your body could still become the grounding contact.

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EAB wrote:

that I'm understanding that you'd really only need a grounded, outdoor cord for devises that require more draw, like a fog machine, a snow machine or some major flood lamps.

More simply, you need a grounded cord for things that have a 3-prong plug on them. If you're building your own boxes (for outlets or controllers) you should alsoground anything with a metal enclosure (as Marty said). Current draw really doesn't have anything to do with it.

Using lamb cord

What did the sheep think about this?

-Tim

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While we are discussing indoor lamp cords, I might add one other trick now that we will be taking down our displays. In the very cold climates, if the ground is frozen, it is good to take all your lights/cords down and let them thaw out a few minutes before trying to wrap them up.

If they are frozen, they could be brittle and crack giving you problems next year. I've found out the hard way with some light sets.

What I normally do is take down a bunch, bring them inside. While they are thawing out, I start taking down another bunch. I then go and wrap the first bunch. This keeps things moving. It is also nice to wrap things up in a nice warm house. It gives my fingers time to defrost also!!! :cool:

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Traveldude189 wrote:

I prefer to use indoor extension cords outside i did have some problems this year, i had to replace a few since they were about as old as my grandparents.

Glad you caught them before you had any problems. As with any extension cords, please check all cords before using each year. Even the "outdoor" cords can develop cracks which make them hazardous.

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If you start your outdoor circut at a GFI you should not have any problems regarding safetybut your circuts may trip sooner during bad weather. Marty's post is excellent regarding metal boxes or anything that can conduct electricity particularly at starting points in your display that draw more amps such as controllers. Take 3 prongs as far into your displayas you can but a GFI will insure safety.

Indoor cords work fine outdoors but typically have a lower amp rating, so don't connect thewhole yard to your indoor cord.

Glenn

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