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Oh, that's different than what the OP said. Sure,you can cut the cord between each socket and put a male end on each one. C-7 lights are all 120V in parallel, unlike mini lights that are just a few volts in series. Just make sure you cover any bare wires (I used electrical tape on the lights I used for Halloween with no problems)

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Mine don't. I figure a single C-7 isn't going to load the circuit that much. The bulb would probably burn outbefore any power problems would damage the wiring. Even if you're only cutting the strand in half, you're using less power than the original strand, and that didn't have a fuse.

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Jeremy Lawton wrote:

Does anyone know of anywhere that sells 2 prong male plugs in bulk and cheap?

Action Lighting. GOTO www.actionlighting.com and order their catalog(s). You will do better if you call to order rather than trying to use the web site. The web site will only figure full case quantities in most cases but you can get whatever quantity you want if you call.

TED

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Jeremy Lawton wrote:

Hey thanks ted! I'll see what I can do about getting those ordered!

You are very welcome! They call them "SPT1 or SPT2 Plugs". You will need to know which wire size you have. Male plugs are 6.26 for a package of 12. Female plugs are 7.54 for a package of 12. These are the type that go "sideways" on the wire and then the cover slides on. There are a couple triangular "teeth" that pierce the wire to make the connection. Because of this they are called by the slang name "vampire taps" here on P.C. To find these on the action lighting web site click "Christmas" and then "Holiday Installation Accessories".

TED

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Jeremy, think through your whole project and put together a single order with actionlighting. They're great to work with.

I bought bulk cable with C7 sockets on them (comes in a variety of distances between sockets) and then just cut it in the lengths I needed and added plugs as needed. I'd also suggest buying a bag of sockets (was about $5 for 100) so you can add sockets if needed or replace a defective one.

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Action lighting is a great place for anthing dealing with C7 or C9 lights. Im getting ready to place an order with them. Right now I have several strands of 25 C9 to outline the house that I bought at Walmart, I end up with extras at the end of each strand, and with the bulk rolls you can cut to length and replace any broken sockets that you incur, wheras with the premade strands you have to cut and splice the wires.

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Hey Jeremy,

Just curios. What exactly are you going to make? This year I bought some c7 strands at Costco that have the big plastic shell around them to make it look like a large c7. Those strands are only 10 lights on a strand and I was actually thinking of cutting them to make 10 strands. Thought they would look cool on a controller.

JR

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Well actually thought about buying a bigroll of those strands to replace the small sets of 25. I had problems with fuses on the strands becuase it recomends that you only connect 2 strands together, i squeeze three together but its not recommended. And with the big roll I could reduce the number of extension cords because I could have two sets for the whole house instead of 8-10 small sets. This in turn will help me becuase once I get the long strands that will free up the lights off the house and I can use those for a 12' tree that I could build a contoller for. Works out both ways.

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ctownpolicedispatcher wrote:

Well actually thought about buying a bigroll of those strands to replace the small sets of 25. I had problems with fuses on the strands becuase it recomends that you only connect 2 strands together, i squeeze three together but its not recommended. And with the big roll I could reduce the number of extension cords because I could have two sets for the whole house instead of 8-10 small sets. This in turn will help me becuase once I get the long strands that will free up the lights off the house and I can use those for a 12' tree that I could build a contoller for. Works out both ways.

This year I used my very first sets of c-9's. I actually stayed with just the 25 bulb strands because of the power usage. With each strand using 1.5 volts and the max of 3 connected thats 4.5 volts. Next year when I start using LOR I figured that was a good spot to stop. that will allow meto double them up for a total of 9 amps. Max I believe is 10 so that just worked perfect I thougt.

JR

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Yeah, that would work. I now have 9 sets that outline the roof. By splitting that into two sections I can use two channels on the LOR to control the C-9's, just have to make sure that when I program it to copy the functions on both channels so that the C9's all come on together and do the same things. How many lights have you used this year? Im up to about 1800. Think Ill stop this year and buy a ton day after christmas so I can get them about 50% off. It is real addicting and would like to have had a LOR kit this year but there sold out till next year.

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ctownpolicedispatcher wrote:

Yeah, that would work. I now have 9 sets that outline the roof. By splitting that into two sections I can use two channels on the LOR to control the C-9's, just have to make sure that when I program it to copy the functions on both channels so that the C9's all come on together and do the same things. How many lights have you used this year? Im up to about 1800. Think Ill stop this year and buy a ton day after christmas so I can get them about 50% off. It is real addicting and would like to have had a LOR kit this year but there sold out till next year.

I am still fairly new at doing lights. I am only up to about 8000 lights with 225 of those being c-9's exactly the same as you 9 strands of 25. With pulling about a third of the 42 amps needs. This year I actually made a spread sheet on my computer to count up the lights, watts, and amps. Mostly to make sure that I didn't overload anything. It kinda sucked the first few nights. If I used my copier in my home office after 4:30 when the lights turned on I would pop the breaker. Luckely I pulled a 12-3 to my overhang to give me 2 more 20 amps, that taking the load of the c9's and everything else up on the roof.

JR

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itsmejrv wrote:

This year I used my very first sets of c-9's. I actually stayed with just the 25 bulb strands because of the power usage. With each strand using 1.5 volts and the max of 3 connected thats 4.5 volts. Next year when I start using LOR I figured that was a good spot to stop. that will allow meto double them up for a total of 9 amps. Max I believe is 10 so that just worked perfect I thougt.

JR

JR,

Did you mean Amps? (not volts?). The C9 and C7 1/2 lamps run from 120V in parallel and burn 7Watts and 5Watts respectively.

The current for each bulb adds to the total current, so a store bought string of 25 C9s totals 175Watts, or 1.45Amps from a 120V circuit.

Typically the plugsfor each store bought string include a 5Amp fuse. So, as you said, three strings can be placed together and not rupture the fuse. Some older strings had 7Amp fuses (and originallyC9 lamps were 9Watts each).

If the OP is still reading, it's okay to have a single C9 lamp socket on a male plug, or any other combination up to the rating for the wire and the plug.

*** Thereis a very important point that may have been over looked in earlier relies to your question. ***

The fuse doesn't protect the light bulbs, it protects the building or other flammable material if there is a short circuitin the string.

The short circuit could be a bad bulb, a bad socket (even onethat gets wet in the rain or snow),or it could be a short across the wires (careful with those staple guns when putting up the lights). The fuse must be the weakest link to protect the circuit from overload and overheating that could be dangerous and a fire hazard.

Most commercially made strings or bulk sockets are machine inserted and snap together. Inside the socket thebulb contacts pierce the wire insulation. It's fairly easy to break off unwanted sockets, just remember to cover the "wound" (damaged wire insulation)in the wire with electrical tape.

Comments Welcome!

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