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Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

SparkDr

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About SparkDr

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  • My favorite Christmas story
    My favorite story has yet to be told.
  • Location
    Hudson Falls, NY
  • Biography
    Metro-Jethro: an avid outdoorsman workin' in a white collar world.
  • Interests
    Hunting, camping, ATV's, Golf, NASCAR.
  • Occupation
    Sales Manager
  • About my display
    LOR synchronized LED's and pixels

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  1. SparkDr

    Snubbers

    I've got hundreds of the resistors, but only about 50 of the plugs. I can assemble them to order until the parts run out. What's everybody looking for in terms of quantity and pricing?
  2. Consider a lighting contactor. I've used them in commercial and residential projects for security lighting and/or landscape lighting projects. A single time clock can be used to power up multiple circuits or lighting loads at the same time. I recently used a 16 pole contactor for a large residential project to control low voltage, line voltage, and motor loads (water pumps for fountains). I used 13 poles of a 16 pole contactor so there is room for expansion. I'm controlling it with an Intermatic astronomical time clock for self-adjusting dusk to dawn & daylight savings time operation.
  3. As an electrician, here's what I see so far. You've got a double-pole 30amp breaker feeding a 20a 250volt receptacle with an unknown wire size gauge connecting them. Regardless, it's not simple or cost effective to split this into 2 circuits. You've got 2 hots and a ground wire going to the receptacle and will need 2 hots, 2 neutrals (or 1 shared neutral) and a ground wire for the 2 circuits. This means you're already short a wire right off the start unless you combine your grounds and neutrals (not recommended even though they are technically tied together within the circuit panel box). Also, the box you have is fed by a 2 pole 60amp breaker so it is not 2 60amp circuits as you noted but rather 60amps total. My biggest concern is the blank spaces in the panel box cover. That shiny silver stuff is bare buss bar exposed back there. For the love of god, get yourself over to the home center and spend the 8 bucks for some pop-in plastic cover fill plates. You have a GE TML series box which will take almost any brand of 1" wide fill plate. You've got plenty of room to take a lot of power from that box and not much of a load in place already. Please do the right thing and call in a pro when the time comes. You might lament the cost up front, but you'll never regret having it done correctly and safely.
  4. Never heard of them before reading your post, but after seeing the product must say I am intrigued. I'll be keeping an eye out for any testimonials as well.
  5. As an electrician, I will offer up a little information in hopes of helping clarify things. First and foremost, controllers should always use grounded plugs into GFCI receptacles or circuits protected by GFCI breakers. After that, it becomes your choice as to how strictly you wish to adhere to the NEC (National Electrical Code). The NEC is written primarily in the interest of safety and satisfaction of requirements for insurance purposes. As soon as you elect to use a product outside of it's rated use (ie: SPT outdoors) a code violation occurs and you have, in essence, given your insurance company a reason to deny a claim in the event of a related incident. I'm not saying it happens, only that it could. The things I've seen in the real world would give a code purist ulcers. Unfortunately, it's usually us as homeowners who show the most disregard for our own personal safety by creating our own violations in the interest of cost cutting. I bit the bullet for my display & have 100% outdoor rated 3-prong cords of appropriate wire gauge for all elements. Having said that, it has been one of my biggest expenses against the budget & I won't begrudge the SPT users of their decisions particularly those in non-snow and drier regions. The rest of the info already posted here on ampacity & wire gauge should answer most of the other questions. To add my two cents on waterproofing, I tape nothing. I use a product called Scotchcote by 3M (#43906) on permanent joints. It's ugly, messy, & smells bad (think molasses colored rubber cement), but it works real well. For on the ground joints, I buy 6' lengths of 1" ID self seal polyethylene pipe insulation from any home center & cut it to length to slip over the connections http://www.lowes.com/pd_21416-1410-S12XB/6_4294765361__?productId=1060007&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNs%3Dp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&facetInfo=. While not waterproof, it sheds rain and eliminates snow penetration while elevating the connection slightly off the ground as well. The open ends and mild porousness allow it to breathe and dry out quickly once wet. No nuisance trips yet!
  6. Hudson Falls, NY ( home to LOR as well ) in the Lake George / Saratoga region.
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