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Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

MS_Mike

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About MS_Mike

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    Senior Member

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  • Location
    Carriere, Mississippi, USA
  • Interests
    Animation, pyro, digital control
  • Occupation
    Economic Developer

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  1. Hello everyone! Boy, I had a busy and tough season last year. I started putting up the display and due to work issues and being under the weather, I never finished. I simply took down what I started and said that I would wait until next year. Well, here it is, next year. My plan is to totally change up the display this year which will cause me to reprogram every sequence and generate a new look. Any ideas to spur this old, worn out brain would be greatly appreciated. I have two mega trees with eight slices each of four colors (using 32 total channels) so I am thinking about making each tree two colors with 16 slices each. I have 32, four color mini trees and four leaping lights. I am open for suggestions! Are you guys doing a mini this year? Mike
  2. Prayers answered! I had a cardioversion (shock with the defibrilator) to eliminate a wierd heart rhythm. So far, it's holding!

  3. Hey Mike, Sorry to hear of your medical problems. We had a great time and are planning to meet again next year on the same weekend. Is there anything that I can be praying about concerning your health? Would be happy to remember you during my prayer time.

  4. Just got your message. Sorry, but have been having health problems and was unable to make it. Mike

  5. Hey Man, Hope to see you at our Mississippi Mini next Saturday in Flowood.

  6. Hey Mike, Have you been keeping up with our plans for a get-to-gether in September? Are you interested? Larry Russell Puckett, MS

  7. Gary: I did not mean to offend you, please do not take it as such. I just get really worked up with the entire entertainment industry and their lust (or greed) for money. Same with the professional athletes. We simply disagree with the length of term of protection. We can agree to disagree. The music industry lost me when Garth Brooks made the big deal about wanting to create fees for resale of used CD's. I agree with both of you folks (Nmonkman and Iresq) that they industry has used each and every opportunity to add profit to the product at every opportunity. I don't know for sure, but suspect that mass production of CD's versus the old 33 RPM records is much less, but the price went up significantly. When I worked for Congress, these stuffed shirts from the record industry and their lobbyists (after all we, the consumer were paying the huge fees for the products that allow them to pay these guys) were running all over the halls protecting their congressionally protected $$. Gary, my beef is not with the writer, it is with the artist and recording company which also own a copyright on the production itself. I would love to see (but with the powerful lawyers and lobbyists it will never happen) their copyright protection reduced to 20 years and then the work become public domain. At that point, charge what the market will bear for 20 years, enforce the copyright, and then move on to some other work.
  8. I agree with you. The RIAA is concerned that their total revenue is down. They blame file sharing for the root cause. That is not it at all, the revenue is down because the product is very, very poor. If you don't put out a quality product, no matter what the product, the public will not purchase it. As far as the copyright protection, my beef is the period of time that the copyright protection is in place. It should be more reasonable 20-40 years and that is it. If a company can recover its costs and develop a profit from a patent within 17 years, there is absolutely no reason that a copyright holder should be entitled to more protection than that. I don't watch any professional sports because the athletes are playing for the almighty $$ not for the game, that makes it no longer a game. Same thing with the entertainment industry. I don't go to movies, will only watch them on TV when they are free. I get sick and tired of the greed and political agendas that these folks have. My only point is that the cowboy RIAA and their heavy handed tactics are over the top. If the recording industry goes belly up tomorrow, I would feel absolutely no loss whatsoever. There will always be a group of writers and artists creating music. I don't have any issue paying for what I enjoy and use. The next thing is that these clowns will want each and every person who uses any music in their sequences to obtain an ASCAP or BMI license only because they are greedy. I, for one, will do whatever I can to legally limit their revenue, but the operative point is, legally which I maintain completely.
  9. "Artistic Works" protected by copyright should be limited to a finite period of time just as patents are. There is no more effort, work, or creativity in the copyright material than the work or effort put into the research or development to develop a new product or process that would be comercially marketed and protected by patent. In my opinion, the people who write songs and produce other copyrighted material are no more deserving, nor special than those who develop new products or materials protected by patent. I will concede that the copyright is issued for a lifetime plus 70 years, suppose that you write some little ditty at age 20, live to 75, then you or your estate would be paid for a period of 125 years! Does anyone feel a little overwhelmed by this? I would be grateful if I could be guaranteed an income for 125 years! Heck, that's better than winning the lottery! You make my point.
  10. That is incorrect sir, copyright can be extended virtually forever while patents are time limited. If this were not correct, then there would be no generic drugs. If the RIAA were involved in the pharmaceutical industry, we'd be paying several hundred dollars per pill. I have had it up to here with the recording industry, and I used to be involved with them. The artists are usually pompous individuals who start out interested in their work and then greed takes over. I sat in a control room at radio stations during ASCAP and BMI audits and would intentionally not play selections from some artists to keep their numbers down so it would reduce their payments from the ASCAP and BMI license. Mike
  11. MS_Mike

    Taking roll!

    Let's get a list together of people in Louisiana/Mississippi/Alabama/Florida (panhandle) that might be interested in getting together in the upcoming year. If we do not have anything more than a one day event to socialize and meet and greet each other, it would be a great opportunity. Maybe we can develop it into a mini plus that will present some opportunities to learn from each other and maybe from a couple of the experts! If you will post, email, or PM your contact information so that I can build a mailing/email list to see who might be interested, we will work on putting something together. Mike
  12. MS_Mike

    Taking roll here

    Let's get a list together of people in Louisiana/Mississippi/Alabama/Florida (panhandle) that might be interested in getting together in the upcoming year. If we do not have anything more than a one day event to socialize and meet and greet each other, it would be a great opportunity. Maybe we can develop it into a mini plus that will present some opportunities to learn from each other and maybe from a couple of the experts! If you will post, email, or PM your contact information so that I can build a mailing/email list to see who might be interested, we will work on putting something together. Mike
  13. Let's get a list together of people in Louisiana/Mississippi/Alabama/Florida (panhandle) that might be interested in getting together in the upcoming year. If we do not have anything more than a one day event to socialize and meet and greet each other, it would be a great opportunity. Maybe we can develop it into a mini plus that will present some opportunities to learn from each other and maybe from a couple of the experts! If you will post, email, or PM your contact information so that I can build a mailing/email list to see who might be interested, we will work on putting something together. Mike
  14. Let's get a list together of people in Louisiana/Mississippi/Alabama/Florida (panhandle) that might be interested in getting together in the upcoming year. If we do not have anything more than a one day event to socialize and meet and greet each other, it would be a great opportunity. Maybe we can develop it into a mini plus that will present some opportunities to learn from each other and maybe from a couple of the experts! If you will post, email, or PM your contact information so that I can build a mailing/email list to see who might be interested, we will work on putting something together. Mike
  15. I purchase and own each and every song that I use and I have several hundred in my computer. However, I find the recording industry a little over zealous in their attitude. Let me explain. Drug companies, computer chip manufacturers, military weapons developers, and the ilk spend millions of dollars doing research and development of new products on which they eventually obtain a patent to protect their rights. This patent is given to them to allow them to recover their research and development costs for a period of time; I believe it is still 17 years. Yes, they can obtain an extension of time on that patent, but for the most part it is not automatic and they try to recover their costs and make a reasonable profit within this period. Yet, some clown gets up and sings a song in a three minute period in a recording studio and the US Copyright laws give them the right to recover a profit every time it is sold, played on a radio station, sold over the internet, and even (now) played on you-tube. Do you find something wrong with this scenario? I would hope that Congress (I used to work for these pompous idiots for 12 years) would find the courage to limit the RIAA in the upcoming Congress. They spend a few thousand dollars recording a song and expect returns on this investment, protected by Congress, for a lifetime while other companies must recoup a decent return on their investment in a limited period of time. Am I proposing legalizing piracy of recordings? NO, but there must be a limitation on the recording industry who continues to attack innocent people like my friends on here such as Richard Holdman and others who simply are providing a form on enjoyment to the public displaying their work and creativity on the web. Ok, RIAA, your turn to explain why some hillbilly nose picker needs to be paid 100 years from now for something he or she recorded 50 years ago.
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