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Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

Fodstar

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Fodstar last won the day on December 22 2019

Fodstar had the most liked content!

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About Fodstar

  • Rank
    Distinguished Member

Profile Information

  • My favorite Christmas story
    Every one.
  • Location
    Los Angeles/CA
  • Biography
    I'm just this guy...
  • Interests
    Holiday decorating; duh. :-)
  • Occupation
    I do stuff for others so I have the money to do stuff for myself.
  • About my display
    My display started out in 2013 as a string of 150 C9s along the roofline and is now up to approximately 10,000 lights. The display is semi-static and primarily LED.

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  1. This company has some options that may meet your needs: https://christmas-leds.com/product-category/m5-m6-led-wire-frame-light-strings/
  2. Thanks, Donna. It wasn't but was some pretty good baked goods. Had a box of those earlier in the month; they were equally decimated. :-)
  3. Thanks! Yep; a Harry & David order that my family decimated in short order. 😀
  4. Details: Approximately 10,000 lights, mostly LED Power requirements: Less than 9 amps Set up time: 55 hours. Lights on: November 28. IMG_0817.MOV
  5. Wonderful display (and I laughed out loud when I saw the lamp). How long did set up take?
  6. I swung by the local Home Depot last night. It is starting to reduce select items, but not significantly or broadly. Also, not surprisingly, selection was very picked over. About the only things available in quantity were string lights.
  7. Welcome and beautiful display; thanks for sharing!
  8. May the (Christmas) Force be with you. Nice job, Derek.
  9. Addition to my 2019 display courtesy of a neighbor. One small crack and faded/chipped paint, but otherwise is really great shape - it even had the original wiring harness (which I've replaced).
  10. Mel, I don't believe I've previously commented or responded to one of your posts, but I always look forward to reading them. Your willingness to share the vast knowledge you have is very much appreciated, even by board lurkers, such as myself. I've been inspired by you and others who share an interest in molds to incorporate them into my display for the first time this year and have enjoyed my first tentative steps in learning about and finding "classic" pieces. Thank you for all of your efforts.
  11. Welcome Jack, I'd encourage you to spend some time surfing various suppliers' websites for ideas and to familiarize yourself with some of the pre-fabricated options on the market. Once you have a good idea of what's available and at what price point you'll be in a good position to start thinking about how to execute your vision. Fabricating your own elements can be a lot of fun, but also a bit challenging when you're just getting started. I find it very helpful to sketch out my vision on paper. I tend to layer my sketches, starting with general positioning of elements, then going back and adding specifics such as bulb type, color, and electrical circuit until I have a robust blueprint from which I can work when it comes time to install. With regard to electricity, it is important to match the requirements of your vision with the capacity of your location; if you want to run a 100 amp display off a single 20 amp (standard household) circuit, you'll be setting yourself up for disappointment. Don't hesitate to consult with an electrician if you have questions/concerns about working with electricity. Electrical capacity may also influence your choice of elements/materials. For example, LED bulbs use substantially less power than incandescent bulbs, which means you came run more of them (i.e. have a bigger display) per amp.
  12. I finished set up yesterday, but decided to stay dark until Thanksgiving. Bad weather (rain, strong wind) predicted through Friday. Crossing my fingers everything holds together/no shorts.
  13. I use a tote and labeled ziplock bags to keep track of where each one goes.
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