Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

tonyjmartin

Members
  • Content Count

    524
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

4 Followers

About tonyjmartin

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 03/16/1962

Profile Information

  • Location
    Traverse City, MI
  • Biography
    California Ex-Patriot, Ex-Theater Professional.
  • Interests
    Christmas Lights!
  • Occupation
    Stay-at-Home Dad re-entering the workforce.
  • About my display
    2003: First year. 175' of icicles.
    2004: Added snowflakes and candycanes.
    2005: Added 3 light trees, roof rope light, and two Digital Decorating six channel controllers. 14,000 lights.
    2006: Added roof snowflakes, four more controllers, and an FM transmitter.
    2007: Added sixteen trees, yard lines/swags, Peanuts characters, Mega Tree, more roof snowflakes, more rope light, 100amp subpanel, LED sign, and twelve D-light controllers. 28,000 lights total.
    2008: Skipped doing a Christmas display to finish second bathroom.
    2009: The controller fleet is now at 14, but we just moved to Michigan, so I suppose the display will have to wait another year.
  1. Over the years glycol based fog fluid had been shunned in lieu of other formulations, but it's been more than 10 years since I've read the actor's union statement on the use of "airborne media" for fog and haze effects (A colleague of mine was one of the co-authors, if not a consultant on the project, if memory serves.) I'll poke around and see if I can find the specifics. IMHO--the whole thing was a bit alarmist, but when you are in a closed environment (aka performance space) night after night, then exposure does become a concern.. Much like the cumulative effect of loud working environments in relation to both temporary and permanent hearing loss. Barring further research, outdoor use shouldn't be a concern, unless you are sitting at the jet of a fog machine, for hours/days at a time. But this was a hotbed of emotionally-charged controversy for years in legit theater. And actors do tend to be a rather high-maintenance lot, so I took that into consideration at the time.
  2. "Men will cook if there's danger involved." - Rita Rudner
  3. JHolmes: you are starting to use the terms fog and haze interchangeably. They are not the same. Also, be sure to check the compatibility chart on the Froggy's Fog site, as the above link is for haze fluid, not fog fluid, as in your original question. These two terms refer to two very different effects.
  4. A few people have dabbled in making their displays interactive online, so there is an interest. Early on, there was Komar's display, but I read that this proved to originally be a hoax, as the apparent control was pretty basic and therefore easier to emulate than to actually implement. I do not know if he eventually succeeded in offering some form of online real-time control.
  5. At a glance, I would put these somewhere between the PC and Showtime controllers, given the screw down connections and the robust looking board traces. Though I do find the lack of heat sinks on the triacs a little disturbing. Perhaps a higher capacity component? Given that there is no mention of any other companies and/or gadgets on their site, I assume that these relatively recent fascinations in the hobby community have little to do with Revival's intended market. But remember, LOR-S2 cannot yet send DMX without an expensive add-on piece of hardware, and D-Light just got DMX off the workbench for it's controllers, so it's a bit premature to start measuring every other product by a standard that's still experiencing growing pains as it's worked into home decorating gear.
  6. From their site it appears that they've been around since mid-2009, and that their niche is the worship market. So it stands to reason that their public presence may not be obvious to holiday decorating crowd.
  7. Well, I'm sure that will be the start of a positive exchange. And San Diego? All the more reason not to trust them.
  8. What Dennis said. The exact phrase you mentioned appears elusive, but it's fairly easy to infer an answer from available information (link).
  9. There's an echo in here. This is a copy/paste of the same information from 2008 located at the link I provided above.
  10. Here's a couple of the strobe units used in the Florida show (scroll down to post #127 in a thread from this forum). Dataflash AF1000 ColorBlast® 12 Powercore Not sure exactly what they're using in Anaheim, but there have been some recent upgrades (see post #2 in this thread on another forum).
  11. ***sound of a giant can of worms being pried open***
×
×
  • Create New...