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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

brianfox

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About brianfox

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 03/18/1967

Profile Information

  • Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
  • Biography
    Newbie
  • Interests
    Halloween
  • Occupation
    Engineer
  • About my display
    2010 Display:
    505 AC Channels
    138 DMX Channels

    23 CTB16PC Controllers
    11 CTB08PC Controllers
    1 iDMX
    1 Spare CTB16PC (just in case)
  1. If you are having problems with V-LED, Mighty Mini Floods, or Rainbow Floods and you are using some Constant Current driver, I want to share the problems I've already had and the solutions I found. I am using 22 MMFL in my display (they look awesome, BTW), and they are being driven by VDRIVE units. Like many of you, I am using CAT5 to connect the flood light to the controller. I know that some people have the controller housed in the light itself, which in retrospect was probably the way I should have gone. I have the expensive ECS-RJ45 outdoor connector systems on all of my floods. They provide a weather-resistant connection. I've had the following problems so far (all have occurred on otherwise working units). Also included is what I did to fix it: 1) One flood stuck with Blue always on. I am sending back the VDRIVE for repair - nothing I can do to fix it myself. 2) One flood went completely dark. To debug, I made the mistake of trying to swap the dark flood with a working one. The reason this was a mistake was that it wasnt the flood that went bad - it was the connector. When I pulled the RJ45 at the flood-end (at the ECS housing), I saw that the conductors were completely charred. By plugging that charred connector into a good flood, I risked spreading the problem, so always check your terminals!! This is (in my opinion) a big drawback of using CAT5 with a CC driver. Constant Current does not mean that the driver will always pump out an exact amount of current. It senses the current returning to the controller, and if it is low, it increases the current it sends out. The reason the current would be low on the return path is that there is some resistive element out there - the LEDs, a long cable, or in my case a charred connector with resistive carbon junk on the end. So the driver increases the current, which makes the connector hotter, which makes it more resistive, which causes the driver to increase the current more. This is a snowball effect where something's got to give. In this case, it's the CAT5 cable, which is only rated at 1/2A per conductor. The good news is that if the connector gets resistive, at least the current won't be going through your flood. So in that respect, your CAT5 connector acts as a poor man's fuse. So the first thing I tried was replacing the cable, and cleaning out the charred remains from the ECS socket. I scrubbed and scrubbed, and used flux remover on it. It looked bright and shiny, and when I applied power, the flood sprang to life.....for about 30 seconds. It then started to flicker and finally went out. I pulled the plug, and saw that the new CAT5 was equally as charred as before. So, clearly, the RJ45 socket still had enough junk to be causing resistive activity. I then chopped off the socket and put on a brand new RJ45 plug, then used a female-female coupler to restore the connection. RGB stayed on for a full 15 minutes straight before I finally shut it off. I made a weatherproof housing for my coupler and called that problem fixed. 3) Blue went dark in one flood. Same as 2, except the charring wasn't enough to spread to the other colors. I fixed it by doing the same thing - cutting off connector and socket and putting on new ones. The reason I mention this is that your burned out connector may have more than one symptom. 4) In 20 out of 22 floods, white went dark! Fortunately, I was able to use R+G+B to create white, so it didn't do too much damage to my display. I pulled off one flood, opened it up, and verified that it was the LEDs. In each leg (MMFL has two LED legs), one of the Warm White LEDs went bad. I should note that MMFL uses a conbination of White and Warm White LEDs to make the White color look less "LED-like". It works, but evidently, the Warm White LEDs from CeCe were not truly capable of sustaining 90mA**. Remember - a CC driver doesn't use a current limiting resistor in the floods. I can't blame this failure on the CC driver, but.... One BIG issue I have with CC drivers (and there seems to be no way around it) is that if a single LED in your flood goes open, it will take out the working leg as well. Remember, all of these DIY floods have two or more current legs. So in a working MMFL, I have 90mA going through each of the two legs for any color. Let's say one LED in a leg goes open. The CC driver will still pump out 180mA -- all of it going through the working leg! That's nearly twice the rated current, and one or more of your LEDs in the working leg will commit suicide. So what if I had gone with current-limiting resistors and a DC controller? Several things: a) If an LED went open, the other leg(s) would continue to work, as the DC controller would be applying a constant voltage, not constant current. Cable length would become an issue. Floods on 100' cables would probably be slightly dimmer than those on 10' cables. c) I would have saved a buttload of money and time. I've read about all the pro's of using CC drivers (usually touted by those who sell them). The biggest selling point is putting fear into you that the DC controller will eventually cause your LEDs to fail. Well, I'm seeing the same **** thing with CC drivers (only the failure is in a different form). So even though I've spent about $800 on CC controllers, I'm not convinced it's the better way to go. Yeah, my display looks great, but probably no different than it would with DC controllers. The DC controller version would have cost me $400 for 5 Summer-sale LOR controllers instead of $800. Another selling point is all the macro functions that the CC controllers can do, since they have a little microprocessor built into each one. So far, the only macros I've seen deal with strobing, and the DC controller can strobe just as well. Plus, I don't think the processors are field-upgradable, so to get the new macros you're going to have to dismantle your floods and send them back foir upgrade. Fading is the final point stressed - a CC controller can fade between 0 and 255 because it uses DMX, whereas a DC controller can only fade between 0 and 100. Well, something I discovered that you might not have considered - since the rest of your display is probably not DMX, when everything else is fading from 100-0 over the same period of time your floods are fading from 255-0, the floods will appear to fade MUCH slower than the rest of your display. It just looks wrong. Which means you need to fade your floods differently, which means more time spent sequencing. I guess we all live and learn. I'm going to ride out the season fixing burned out connectors as they come. As the floods are only the most recent of about 500 problems I've had with my display this year, I'm seriously leaning toward this being my last year. I miss the old days when my biggest problem was a GFI during the rain. I've already spent over 20 hours in the yard chasing elusive Comm issues. I'm kinda HOPING some punk kids take a baseball bat to my lights.... Hoping the rest of you are having better luck in your displays, Brian ** Some may be wondering why I use 90mA and not 100mA. The reason is that when I ordered my VDRIVE units, I specifically asked that the target current be 180mA (two legs of 90mA each). I had no intention of driving any flood at its absolute maximum rated current -- and neither should you!!
  2. This year, my display grew from 12 16-channel controllers to 23-16 channels controllers, 11 8-channel controllers, and 1 DMX controller. I've been chasing comm issues since the start - the display runs great for a day or two, then HW utility only sees half the boxes....then most of them....then none of them. All the while, random display lights flicker while the utility is trying to discover boxes. If this sounds familiar, then you, my friend, have Comm issues! That means the CAT5 that connects your boxes is getting noise from all our power lines. I've scoured over all the forums, and the BEST advice - the advice that solved my problems - came in a single post, and here is the link: http://forums.planetchristmas.com/showthread.php/11849-RS485-Cabling-Advice/page3 What did me in was the fact that I had LOTS of excess cable that I coiled into neat, tidy units - all the while keeping it FAR away from power. What I did not realize was that those coils act as antennas, picking up noise even from far away power lines. When I cut out the excess cable (adding my own RJ45 connectors), the problems went away for good. I still made sure all of my comm lines were away from power. The reason I was so reluctant to do this in the first place was that I had TERRIBLE experiences with RJ45 and crimping toold last year. This year, I bought good connectors and a good tool and it worked GREAT. The tool was from TrendNet ($20 on amazon) The connectors were Tripp Lite (super cheap on Amazon). The only thing you need to be aware of is that there are two types of connectors - ones for stranded wire and one for solid wire. Your CAT5 will be one or the other (probably stranded). You MUST use the right connector based on the conductor type. Personally, I think solid wire is MUCH easier to work with when ordering the colors and putting them in the connector. As far as I know, ther are no markings on the cable to indicate if it is stranded or solid. Finally, my CAT5 is unshielded; Some papers on RS485 tout shielding, and others say it could actually induct noise. I think that if you follow the rules of keeping lines short and away from power, shielding doesn't matter. And for these purposes, CAT5=CAT5E=CAT6; it's all equal when it comes to RS485 at around 19200 baud.
  3. If you are having problems with V-LED, Mighty Mini Floods, or Rainbow Floods and you are using some Constant Current driver, I want to share the problems I've already had and the solutions I found. I am using 22 MMFL in my display (they look awesome, BTW), and they are being driven by VDRIVE units. Like many of you, I am using CAT5 to connect the flood light to the controller. I know that some people have the controller housed in the light itself, which in retrospect was probably the way I should have gone. I have the expensive ECS-RJ45 outdoor connector systems on all of my floods. They provide a weather-resistant connection. I've had the following problems so far (all have occurred on otherwise working units). Also included is what I did to fix it: 1) One flood stuck with Blue always on. I am sending back the VDRIVE for repair - nothing I can do to fix it myself. 2) One flood went completely dark. To debug, I made the mistake of trying to swap the dark flood with a working one. The reason this was a mistake was that it wasnt the flood that went bad - it was the connector. When I pulled the RJ45 at the flood-end (at the ECS housing), I saw that the conductors were completely charred. By plugging that charred connector into a good flood, I risked spreading the problem, so always check your terminals!! This is (in my opinion) a big drawback of using CAT5 with a CC driver. Constant Current does not mean that the driver will always pump out an exact amount of current. It senses the current returning to the controller, and if it is low, it increases the current it sends out. The reason the current would be low on the return path is that there is some resistive element out there - the LEDs, a long cable, or in my case a charred connector with resistive carbon junk on the end. So the driver increases the current, which makes the connector hotter, which makes it more resistive, which causes the driver to increase the current more. This is a snowball effect where something's got to give. In this case, it's the CAT5 cable, which is only rated at 1/2A per conductor. The good news is that if the connector gets resistive, at least the current won't be going through your flood. So in that respect, your CAT5 connector acts as a poor man's fuse. So the first thing I tried was replacing the cable, and cleaning out the charred remains from the ECS socket. I scrubbed and scrubbed, and used flux remover on it. It looked bright and shiny, and when I applied power, the flood sprang to life.....for about 30 seconds. It then started to flicker and finally went out. I pulled the plug, and saw that the new CAT5 was equally as charred as before. So, clearly, the RJ45 socket still had enough junk to be causing resistive activity. I then chopped off the socket and put on a brand new RJ45 plug, then used a female-female coupler to restore the connection. RGB stayed on for a full 15 minutes straight before I finally shut it off. I made a weatherproof housing for my coupler and called that problem fixed. 3) Blue went dark in one flood. Same as 2, except the charring wasn't enough to spread to the other colors. I fixed it by doing the same thing - cutting off connector and socket and putting on new ones. The reason I mention this is that your burned out connector may have more than one symptom. 4) In 20 out of 22 floods, white went dark! Fortunately, I was able to use R+G+B to create white, so it didn't do too much damage to my display. I pulled off one flood, opened it up, and verified that it was the LEDs. In each leg (MMFL has two LED legs), one of the Warm White LEDs went bad. I should note that MMFL uses a conbination of White and Warm White LEDs to make the White color look less "LED-like". It works, but evidently, the Warm White LEDs from CeCe were not truly capable of sustaining 90mA**. Remember - a CC driver doesn't use a current limiting resistor in the floods. I can't blame this failure on the CC driver, but.... One BIG issue I have with CC drivers (and there seems to be no way around it) is that if a single LED in your flood goes open, it will take out the working leg as well. Remember, all of these DIY floods have two or more current legs. So in a working MMFL, I have 90mA going through each of the two legs for any color. Let's say one LED in a leg goes open. The CC driver will still pump out 180mA -- all of it going through the working leg! That's nearly twice the rated current, and one or more of your LEDs in the working leg will commit suicide. So what if I had gone with current-limiting resistors and a DC controller? Several things: a) If an LED went open, the other leg(s) would continue to work, as the DC controller would be applying a constant voltage, not constant current. Cable length would become an issue. Floods on 100' cables would probably be slightly dimmer than those on 10' cables. c) I would have saved a buttload of money and time. I've read about all the pro's of using CC drivers (usually touted by those who sell them). The biggest selling point is putting fear into you that the DC controller will eventually cause your LEDs to fail. Well, I'm seeing the same **** thing with CC drivers (only the failure is in a different form). So even though I've spent about $800 on CC controllers, I'm not convinced it's the better way to go. Yeah, my display looks great, but probably no different than it would with DC controllers. The DC controller version would have cost me $400 for 5 Summer-sale LOR controllers instead of $800. Another selling point is all the macro functions that the CC controllers can do, since they have a little microprocessor built into each one. So far, the only macros I've seen deal with strobing, and the DC controller can strobe just as well. Plus, I don't think the processors are field-upgradable, so to get the new macros you're going to have to dismantle your floods and send them back foir upgrade. Fading is the final point stressed - a CC controller can fade between 0 and 255 because it uses DMX, whereas a DC controller can only fade between 0 and 100. Well, something I discovered that you might not have considered - since the rest of your display is probably not DMX, when everything else is fading from 100-0 over the same period of time your floods are fading from 255-0, the floods will appear to fade MUCH slower than the rest of your display. It just looks wrong. Which means you need to fade your floods differently, which means more time spent sequencing. I guess we all live and learn. I'm going to ride out the season fixing burned out connectors as they come. As the floods are only the most recent of about 500 problems I've had with my display this year, I'm seriously leaning toward this being my last year. I miss the old days when my biggest problem was a GFI during the rain. I've already spent over 20 hours in the yard chasing elusive Comm issues. I'm kinda HOPING some punk kids take a baseball bat to my lights.... Hoping the rest of you are having better luck in your displays, Brian ** Some may be wondering why I use 90mA and not 100mA. The reason is that when I ordered my VDRIVE units, I specifically asked that the target current be 180mA (two legs of 90mA each). I had no intention of driving any flood at its absolute maximum rated current -- and neither should you!!
  4. Thanks all for the help. It was, in fact, the weld seam in the pipe that was causing my headaches. At first, I tried filing it down, but after 10 minutes of filing, I couldn't make a dent in the bump. The quick solition was to attack the pin. I have a $60 belt sander from Harbor Freight, and used it to grind a flat along the length of the pin. Even though the seam feels big to the touch, it doesn't really take much of a pronounced flat to clear it. The pin fit nicely into the pipe after that, but I believe it will never come out. That's fine with me, since I can store a 14' pipe. EDIT: By the way, for my legs, I purchased the rigid conduit (not the thin EMT) from the Depot. It was made in the USA, and talk about quality! No seams inside, and the ends were in excellent shape. The socket end is actually a big coupler. In retrospect, I should have used this stuff instead of the black pipe. In my opinion, it looks pretty darned strong, and screws together.
  5. I should probably point out that the black pipe only came threaded at both ends. Does the ID of the pipe get affected by threads? I'm wondering if I should cut off the pipe before the threads and try that.
  6. I am trying to build a 10' tree using the kit from Christmaslightshow. The new kit has a 5-way base with a male pin that you are supposed to slide the black pipe over. I just purchased a new 1 1/4" black pipe and it won't go onto the pin. It's too tight. It's definitely a 1 1/4", but it goes onto the pin about 1/4" max. I have not tried pounding the assembly together because I'm afraid it will go on about 1" and be permanantly stuck there. I'm not intending to disassemble the pin at the end of the year; I'll leave it connected in storage. Has anyone had problems like this before? Any suggestions? I've tried liberal WD40 and no luck. I'm down to crunch time on my display and really need to get this done ASAP.
  7. Yikes! That was a tragic over-use of shimmer! Nice display, but sustained shimmer+strobes? Not my cup of tea.
  8. It's that time of year again, and even though I bought 15,000 lights this year from private sellers, I still find myself about 70 boxes short (go figure...) If anyone is willing to part with their clear minis, rest assured I can give them a good home. I would really LOVE it if they were the lower power Target type (200mA per string), but any with 2.5" spacing will do. Shipping would be to zip 91320. Thanks much!
  9. There's been a ton of talk about the R values. CeCe sells kits with reasonable values. In my opinion, some of her R values are a little high. CeCe is also more expensive than other brands that popped up. Enclosures... You have a lot of choices here. You can go cheap: Google MQF150, made by Cooper. I used to see these as low as $6.50. They are OK in my opinion, but limit where and how you can mount them. I went with this: http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3800144&CAWELAID=407256421 The ones I got were from Ebay but these are cool because you can clamp them wherever you need them. The housing is dark blue so it hides well. Not to be outdone, Harbor Freight sells a dual lamp mounted on a little sled. Each light can be rotated indiviaually. It sells for about $17. Power supplies... You need a 24V supply. The question is - how much power? They come in 100W, 150W, 200W, etc. Assume 25W per MMFL you want to control. If you have 8 lights, you will need a 200W supply ay a bare minimum. It's always safer to buy more than you need. Here's a link to a 350W supply: http://cgi.ebay.com/New-24V-DC-14-6A-350W-Regulated-Switching-Power-Supply-/120589302236?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0 modders_cn sells all sizes at a decent price. Expect to pay around $20 Housing... You're going to need to mount your DC controller and power supply in a housing of some sort. Most people use: http://www.yourbroadbandstore.com/product.php?pid=706098
  10. I agree. Snip those leads. And to Jim - You mentioned that the current was "calculated". I know Ohm's law is pretty straightforward, but did you MEASURE the current? Any basic meter will let you do this. I think just about everyone would agree - 1/2W LEDs should not be getting too hot to touch. And if you are using the recommended 1W resistors, the resistors should not even be getting warm. At < 100mA, those resistors will practically be acting as heat sinks for any surrounding parts. Something's not right... If an infra-red thermometer was used to read the temperature, I'm wondering if the LEDs were operating an any part of the IR spectrum, producing a bogus reading.
  11. Jim, I have 21 MMFLs and have tested them with all LEDs on for hours. They are not not to the touch and I haven't had a single LED fail. If you are using CeCe's LEDs, you are definitely running them at dangerously high current levels if yours are getting hot. You are simply frying them. You need to get an ammeter and make sure you aren't putting more than 0.1A through any LED. What are your resistor values and resistor wattage? What are you using for a power source? Hopefully not a wall wart. William, Since we are all using DC controllers (like a CMB-16D), doesn't the controller keep the current constant? You aren't suggesting a constant current source for the controller, are you?
  12. Something you need to keep in mind with the SkyBright LEDs is that if they are pulling 150mA, you will only be able to service one flood per CAT5 safely. CAT5 wire is only rated for about 250mA, and can handle 2 floods with CeCe LEDS @ 100mA per flood. Also, SkyBright is not publishing the brightness of the LED (mcd), plus, they have a slightly higher forward voltage than CeCe. The forward voltage is not necessarily an issue, but it means the resistor values will be far different than for CeCe LEDs That said, the price difference between SkyBright and CeCe is substantial. I am curious how a flood with SkyBrights and resistors that limit to 100mA compare to CeCe at 100mA. If the brightness is the same at 100mA, I'd vote for SkyBright any day, as you can safely run them at less than max current and get the same result. However, I have a feeling that SkyBright at 100mA will not be nearly as bright as CeCe at 100mA. Disclaimer: I built 21 MMFL with CeCe LEDs and they are quite nice. CeCe gave me a discount on my order about a month ago. I paid about $31 per MMFL for the LEDs, and got a few spares just in case. Of the 1,100 LEDs I got, two were DOA. All had proper polarity indicators except for a very early batch of Red that were manufactured with the die wired backwards (that was really fun...). They were also very resistant to overheating by a soldering iron (I had to desolder the backward Red LEDS and reinstall). I also purchased 50 UV LEDs from TopBright to test as a substiture for White. In my opinion, the UV LEDs are not ready for prime time. They have a very short range and look far more blue than they should. In fact, the Blue LEDs provide about a good a UV kick as the UV LEDs do. Two years ago I went to Halloween Horror Nights in Orlando. They had haunted house that was based on UV effects, and I recall seeing enormous panels of UV LEDs. These were literally 50x25 LEDs per panel. And the house had at least 100 of them. Those lights worked quite well - but still not as good a traditional UV fluorescent tubes. The reason they opted for LED panels is that they needed to have the LEDs turn on and off instantly - something a tube cannot do. So even a MMFL stuffed with 52 UV LEDs would be disappointing (and expensive). A MMFL stuffed with only 12 subbing for White would be dismal.
  13. Hello again. I finally have my cherry-picked R values that work great with my LEDs. Red: 82 Ohms (100 mA) Green: 51 Ohms (100 mA) Blue: 47 Ohms (95 mA) White: 47 Ohms (100 mA) The current was observed with a 1 ft CAT5 cable. I then put a 50 ft cable in place, and the current dropped by 5mA-10mA. So, for typical runs in a display, the forward current should be safe for the LED. But again, this is based on the LEDs that CeCe shipped me - your batch may be overdriven by those values. Do NOT take my R values as the perfect values. In my testing, the MMFL works really great. The old "floods" I am replacing are simply the clip-ons with the big round aluminum reflector that you can buy from Home Repo. I was using lighting gels and 75W bulbs. I estimate that one color of the MMFL is about the equivalent of a 60W bulb. I imagine that when the glass has condensation or fog on it, the output will be a little less (no heat from LEDs to burn away that fog...) Green by far had the most intense output, followed by Red and White. Red was by no means dim, een though the LEDs have a very low mcd rating. Blue was rather unexpected. The blue LEDs from CeCe have a surprising amount of fluorescence. Anything white that the blue light touched positively glowed, yet everything else had a royal blue to it. I kind of wish they were more pure blue. There was a good deal of washout at a 10ft distance; 5ft from my walls resulted in the most uniform spread with no hot spots. I still can't figure out what the heck to do with White in my display. Anybody think about what they will do? I guess I could "strobe" the white for effect. I am using a fixed Power Supply right now so I cannot color mix as I have no controller yet. I wonder if adding white to a color mix will make it brighter or wash it out. On the subject of CAT5 couplers, the really cheap 50 cent ones were mentioned. I happened to have some of these and I observed that you get what you pay for. The CAT5 male connector had a lot of play in the female coupler, and it was possible to make the LEDs go out by wiggling the connector. In my opinion, this is NOT the way to go, as those couplers come in several flavors: cheap, cheaper, and cheapest. The RJ45 ECS mating system, on the other hand, seems to be highly reliable. Yes, they are expensive at about $4 each, but I don't feel they will let me down. I do have to say having tried them out - they are not the easiest things to work with. To unmate the connector is a several-step process, and you need a small screwdriver to make the RJ45 connector unclip from the locked position. It is by no means a quick disconnect. But seriously, if you connect it once at the start of the season and disconnect it once at the end of the season, it's not that big a deal. Much better than dealing with an unreliable coupler.
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